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Steps to Withdrawal from Lortab (Hydrocodone)

7 Steps To Withdrawal From Lortab

Did you know Lortab (hydrocodone)  is a combination of acetaminophen and hydrocodone? It’s also the most commonly prescribed prescription drug in America. This makes lortab a fairly easy drug to obtain, whether it’s through your family doctor, a friend, relative, or your dope dealer. Lortab addiction usually starts when a doctor prescribes it for a variety of injuries that are painful but not excruciatingly painful.

Withdrawal from Lortab (hydrocodone) will hurt. A way I like to put it is likely be the hardest thing you ever do. No one wants to experience the wide array of symptoms that comes with opiate withdrawal.

While it is extremely easy to say, “That’s it! I’m done!” it’s another thing to actually do it and stick with it. Most times, addicts don’t even know where to begin to start the quitting process. Below are seven basic steps that you can do to begin a world free from addiction.

Step 1) Decide To Quit

This step can only begin when you are truly, 100% ready to quit. It cannot be when someone else thinks you should quit or you will not succeed. For this process to actually work, you need to be fully ready and able to commit to a complete overhaul of your life. Quitting is a lifelong commitment and every aspect of your daily life will need to be changed.

Step 2) Develop A Lortab Withdrawal Recovery Plan

The best way to do this? Write it down! It doesn’t have to be anything fancy, just jot it down on any old piece of paper, and keep that paper somewhere close, where you can easily access it for reassurance and guidance. Make your plan based on simple goals that can easily be reached and that build off one another. Your first goal could be picking a specific date to take your last pill. Your next goal could be something as simple as getting through your first day of withdrawals.

Step 3) Commit To Your Plan 110%

withdrawal from lortab

Lortab is one of the most common prescriptions for pain

The only way that you will ever be free from your addiction is to commit fully to your plan. Not 50%, not 75%, not even 100%. You have to go above and beyond, and commit 110%. This is actually a lot harder than you would realize. A commitment like this is more than just not taking a pill. You will have to delete anyone in your life that has been a support system to your habit. That includes your dope dealer, your doctor, your friends that used with you, anyone that you could easily reach for access to more. Delete their phone numbers from your phones. Tell your doctor’s office that you will no longer be a patient. Don’t answer your door. Any temptation that is left behind leaves an avenue for future use and complete destruction of your hard work.

Step 4) Take Your Last Pill

This step may seem pretty self-explanitory, but you do need to go a little farther and make a plan. Pick an actual day that you will take your last pill. It is suggested to this during a time that you won’t have to go into work, school, or have family obligations, as you will be experiencing the misery of withdrawals. Consider taking a Thursday and Friday off from work so that you will have a four day weekend to get through the toughest part.

Step 5) Start Withdrawals From Lortab (Hydrocodone)

Your withdrawals symptoms are going to last anywhere from 3 days to 2 weeks, depending on your usage amount and time. Your goal during this time is to just endure and get through it. Some symptoms you may experience include chills, sweats, diarrhea, vomiting, pain, restlessness, leg spasms, and rapid heartbeat. The worst, however, will be the cravings and the constant thoughts that you can’t do this or that you need a pill. Remember, the physical symptoms will eventually go away as long as you can resist the urge to use.

Step 6) Immediate Lortab Addiction Recovery

This will require the development of new positive habits to keep you occupied and motivated. Consider joining a gym or picking up a new hobby. Anything that is not directly related to your lortab use and that keeps you from thinking about using is going to assist you in staying free from your addiction.

Step 7) Long Term Lortab/Hydrocodone Maintenance

Recovery is an every day battle if you want to successfully withdrawal from lortab (Hydrocodone). You have to make the concious choice every day not to use. Just one slip up, one time, can mean the destruction of all your hard work. You may want to look into joining Narcotics Anonymous or a comparative support group. Surround yourself with the people that support you and that you can turn to when you feel the urge to use. Stick with your goals and keep your eye on the prize! You have already come this far, no turning back now!


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2 Comments

  • Dr. Cynic,You sound like a very judgmental porsen & maybe should not be a doctor at all. Just because U are sick of certain patients, it doesn’t give U the right to say that all of us are the same.U should be more careful of which patients U accept to treat, but not deny those who actually need the Opioids for some relief. Peripheral Neuropathy is a very painful condition and I wish I did not have it. It is daily torture. There is no way to have a normal life if U have this disease. Yet most doctors won’t treat it with Opioids, which have been proven to be the only effective treatment for it out there. They certainly are not the cure !! There is NO cure. Your classifying ALL pain patients into one category ie Addicts !!That isn’t fair to people like me. I’m left with intractable pain, 24/7 & there’s no willing doctors to be found. Returning to work with a painful condition may not be possible in all cases. It depends on what type of job they’re used to doing. In my case, I can barely get out of bed w/o treatment, so how could I work anywhere ? I’m not looking for handouts either. I do not collect S.S. Disability & can’t. But I will agree with U on one point. And that is that a lot of people who take the Opioids for pain, just get lazy about returning to work. But they do this even if they’re not on Opioids too. So how can U say it’s only for that reason ?Also, the reason your patients are not telling U they are getting any relief is probably because you are under treating their pain. Most doctors do. If they would take more time to listen to their patients, then give them the correct dosages of meds, maybe they would be getting enough relief ? It’s a well-known fact that pain is definitely under treated. Doctors hand out anti-depressants like they are candy. They are terrible answers to pain relief. Most don’t work.Not for Peripheral Neuropathy anyway. Maybe they might for Fibro or the like, but not nerve disease !! And neither do the anti-epileptics work for us either. Tried those also. Several times, with no relief. Only got brain dead from them.I am perfectly normal in the brain dept. I just have excruciating pain all the time. Live with this, Doc. See how it feels. Try to get some sleep. Then get your butt out of bed after maybe 2 to 3 hours sleep & put in a full day of work.I’m lucky if I can get myself into the shower for 10 minutes. The water actually hurts when it hits my skin !! Now that’s painful !! Would U enjoy seeing your wife suffering like this ? Or your child ?Am I Angry about your comment ? U betcha I am !! Have a heart Doc. Don’t judge us all so easily.Sometimes I wish the real pain patients would get a badge of some sort, so the doctors would know who to treat & who not to.And the DEA should get real also. Don’t they have anything better to do with their time ? Maybe all of them should suffer in pain every day too ? Or try to get a shoe on their foot. Or struggle just to stay upright when they attempt to walk outside for the mail and not have to feel like they are stepping on rocks the whole way. I can’t even walk thru my own home without some protection on my feet, so it doesn’t feel like I have sharp pebbles under my feet with every step I take.U know Doc when my doctor asks me what # my pain is .I don’t know what to tell them. That’s because my pain varies so often, that it’s impossible to say truthfully. I’m afraid that if I tell them my pain has come down to a 5 sometimes, that they will think I don’t need anything for relief anymore. But also my pain varies thru out the day and can be anywhere from a 5 to a 12 !! So what do U want me to tell U ? Do U want my pain # at that moment ? Or what it was 5 minutes ago ? Or maybe what it will be in half an hour when my meds start wearing off ?I only ask that U be fair to those who really have true pain. Stop turning us away and leaving us to suffer. That really makes a good porsen start to think if they could take the chance on a street seller. If their own doctor won’t help them, who do we have to turn to ?Since this pain started about 18 years ago for me, I have tried several different approaches to find relief. Nothing at all has given me any relief except Opioid use. Even this doesn’t take the pain away. It merely takes the edge off of it for short period of time. Heck, Doc .I’ll take that !!! It’s lots better than nothing.I’ve recently heard about a new treatment, which again I’m willing to try. If I can find anything that gives me relief, or that may end my need to use Opioids, or at least cut it down, I will do it. I just hope this works, and I can get it under my coverage terms. Sometimes, they just won’t pay anything to help me get it. This is all not to mention also, that I’m made to travel all over the state to find a doctor willing to help. And this is because most of U are not willing to live up to your Oath.I’m sorry that some patients have taken U for a ride. But don’t include all of us in that category, please.

  • HI Beatriz, I know your post is old, but maybe you still check the replies. I am batteling the same demons. I know I am addicted to painkillers that the doctors prescribed, but what am I supposed to do when detox means I can’t get out of bed in the morning because of my pain? They don’t think about that. It is all about quitting, but then what about the pain??
    Hope you are doing well
    Elke


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